Silenced: A James Spione Film


This disquieting documentary spotlights the ordeals of three former federal workers whose revelations of illegal government activities resulted in two of them being charged with multiple offenses under the Espionage Act.
What the Bush and Obama administrations do when someone tells the truth.
 
 Academy Award nominated director James Spione, who discussed his film Silenced, which deals with Washington’s increasingly draconian response to whistleblowers, and the devastating personal toll on those who’ve questioned official national security policy. Two of the three whistleblowers highlighted in the film, John Kiriakou and Thomas Drake, later joined the program to share their experiences and reflect on how their lives were affected once they found themselves in the crosshairs of a vindictive federal government.
Spione observed that the climate of fear and security that has enveloped the United States since 9/11 has given way to a situation where whistleblowers are “not just persecuted, they’re prosecuted to an unprecedented degree.” Compounding this troubling issue, he said, is that the whistleblowers who seem to draw the most vociferous response of the government do so because they reveal information which challenges official policy or exposes criminality. He also noted that prosecution of whistleblowers under the Espionage Act has increased significantly under the Obama administration, which has invoked the law “more times that all other administrations combined in the last 100 years.” Ironically, Spione mused, this tenacious approach has led to new whistleblowers taking extreme measures to release information, such as in the case of Edward Snowden, who fled the country in order to be heard.
Silenced

 

Silenced

2014 NR Rated NR

rated 4.9 stars

4.9
This disquieting documentary spotlights the ordeals of three former federal workers whose revelations of illegal government activities resulted in two of them being charged with multiple offenses under the Espionage Act.
Added to the Saved section of your Queue on 12/15/2015Manage Queue
Gene

 

El der

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