Soros, central banks buying deep into gold, causing inflation and high interest rates – gold expert


 

American hedge fund billionaire George Soros is back in the headlines after revelations that the shadowy political donor has been hiding his fortune from US regulators with at least three offshore companies, including Mossack Fonseca, the firm exposed by the Panama Papers leak. While it seems like this slipped by the mainstream media, another controversy seems to have even more so. The notorious billionaire has sold off an entire third of his stocks and bought a $264 million share in the world’s largest gold mining company. If history teaches us anything, Soros is a great financial mastermind who hatches schemes with global impact. Gold expert and Regal Gold Assets CEO Tyler Gallagher joins “News With Ed” to talk about it.

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UN Security Council may arm Libyan unity gov’t to fight ISIS


 

RT America | May 16, 2016

Members of the UN Security Council say they’re ready to lift an arms embargo and supply the Libyan unity government with weapons to combat Islamic State terrorists. This decision is stated in an official communique of talks in Vienna, signed by all five permanent UN Security Council members ‒ the US, Russia, France, UK and China ‒ as well as the representatives from more than 15 other countries participating in the talks. RT’s Peter Oliver reports from Austria. Then, RT America’s Simone Del Rosario is joined by Daniel McAdams, executive director of the Ron Paul Institute for Peace and Prosperity, to talk about the legitimacy of the “unity” government and more.

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Many of Today’s Factory Workers Rely on Public Assistance


Workers at a factory. (photo: Bloomberg)
Workers at a factory. (photo: Bloomberg)

 

Bourree Lamn | The Atlantic | Reader Supported News | May 14, 2016

Nostalgia for manufacturing jobs is obscuring the fact that their 21st-century incarnation doesn’t tend to pay very well.

ince the peak of U.S. manufacturing in the late 1970s, over 7 million jobs in the sector have been lost. More specifically, employment in factories all but collapsed in the aughts, when the industry shed 5 million jobs.

Throughout these many years of decline, talk of the need for an industry revival was common the in Rust Belt cities where manufacturing had played a large economic role. Now, on the national stage, the same argument has emerged as a political touchpoint, with presidential candidates proposing the cancellation of international trade agreements so that manufacturing jobs can make a comeback America. Though employment in the manufacturing sector has rebounded significantly in recent years, the election-year spotlight begs a question: Are these manufacturing jobs built to last?

A new report from Berkeley’s Center for Labor Research and Education takes aim at this question. Analyzing the five largest means-tested public-benefit programs for which good data was available, the report found that over a third of manufacturing workers rely on safety-net programs such as Medicaid, food stamps, or household-income assistance. The Center estimates that Americans who work in low-wage manufacturing jobs currently receive $10.2 billion a year in federal and local public assistance.

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State Department: International Treaties Do Not Demand Monopoly On Marijuana Production


NORML | May 12, 2016

Washington, DC: United States treaty obligations do not mandate the federal government to limit marijuana production to a single licensed facility, according to written statements provided by the State Department to Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY).

The Department’s statements run counter to opinions expressed by the US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), which has long alleged that there can only be one federally licensed cultivator of marijuana for research purposes – the University of Mississippi, as overseen by the US National Institute on Drug Abuse. In 2011, the DEA rejected an order from its own administrative law judge calling on the agency to issue additional cultivation licenses. The agency claimed that allowing such activity would be “inconsistent with United States obligations under the Single Convention (treaty).”

But in response to an inquiry from Sen. Gillibrand, representatives from the State Department’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement have now denied the DEA’s claim, stating, “If a party to the Single Convention issued multiple licenses for the cultivation of cannabis for medical and scientific purposes, that fact alone would not be a sufficient basis to conclude that the party was acting in contravention of the Convention.”

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Poor Wages Send a Third of US Manufacturing Workers to Welfare Lines in Order to Pay for Food, Healthcare, Data Show


A welder works in Port Fourchon, Louisiana, May 3, 2010. (photo: Sean Gardner/Reuters)
A welder works in Port Fourchon, Louisiana, May 3, 2010. (photo: Sean Gardner/Reuters)

 

Angelo Young | International Business Times | Reader Supported News | May 12, 2016

.S. manufacturing jobs used to be a path to the middle class for Americans who couldn’t or didn’t dive into the comfort provided by higher education degrees. But now many skilled, working Americans need some form of public assistance because their wages don’t pay for basic living expenses.

Just over 2 million supervised manufacturing workers, or about a third of the total, need food stamps, Medicaid, tax credits for the poor or other forms of publicly subsided assistance while they work on goods that can carry the tag “Made in the U.S.A.,” according to research of official government wage and welfare data relased Tuesday by the University of California, Berkeley.

The cost of these benefits to the U.S. taxpayer? From 2009 to 2013, federal and state governments subsidized the low manufacturing wages paid by the private sector to the tune of $10.2 million per year.

Oregon led the nation on the number of manufacturing workers – 1 in 4 – that needed food stamps during that period of time, while 1 in 5 factory workers in Mississippi and Illinois needed healthcare assistance for both adults (Medicaid) and children (CHIP). Taking into account all major social welfare, including the earned income tax credit and temporary assistance to needy families (TANF), Mississippi topped the list, followed by Georgia, California and Texas.

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Religious leaders object to religious objections law


Associated Press | Mississippi Business Journal | April 28, 2016

Dozens of Methodist leaders are objecting to Mississippi’s new religious objections law, saying it violates their religious principles.

More than 30 ministers from around the state and nation published an open letter Monday saying the so-called “religious freedom” law goes against Christian teachings to love and respect all people. The group joins major businesses, human rights groups and legal experts in opposing the incoming law, which they say discriminates against the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.

The law lets churches and some private businesses deny services to gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people because of religious beliefs. It’s similar to one vetoed by Georgia’s governor in late March. Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant signed the measure into law earlier this month.

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US Ranks 41st on Global Press Freedom List


White House Press Corps. (photo: AP)
White House Press Corps. (photo: AP)

 

Julian Hattem | The Hill | Reader Supported News | April 20, 2016

he United States ranked 41st in global press freedom by an international journalist advocacy group in an annual list released on Wednesday.

Reporters Without Borders claimed that, despite being enshrined in the Constitution, freedom of the press “has encountered a major obstacle” in the U.S. due to “the government’s war on whistleblowers.”

Reporters Without Borders also chided the U.S. for not establishing a federal “shield law” protecting journalists from having to reveal their sources.

The ranking was actually an eight-spot improvement over 2015, when the U.S. came in 49th in the world.

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Bad News: Only 6% of Americans trust the media – survey


 

Teflon Toxin Contamination Has Spread Throughout the World


PFOA has spread throughout the world. (photo: The Intercept)
PFOA has spread throughout the world. (photo: The Intercept)

 

Sharon Lerner | The Intercept | Reader Supported News | April 19, 2016

n recent months, PFOA, the perfluorinated chemical formerly used to make Teflon, has been making news again. Also known as C8, because of its eight-carbon molecule, PFOA has been found in drinking water in Hoosick Falls, New York; Bennington, Vermont; Flint, Michigan; and Warrington, Pennsylvania, among many other places across the United States. Although the chemical was developed and long manufactured in the United States, it’s not just an American problem. PFOA has spread throughout the world.

As in the U.S., PFOA has leached into the water near factories in Dordrecht, Holland, and Shimizu, Japan, both of which were built and operated for many years by DuPont. Last year, the Shimizu facility and part of the Dordrecht plant became the property of DuPont’s spinoff company, Chemours. Just as it did in both New Jersey and West Virginia, DuPont tracked the PFOA levels in its workers’ blood in Holland and Japan for years, according to EPA filings and internal company documents. Many of the blood levels were high, some extremely so. In one case, in Shimizu in 2008, a worker had a blood level of 8,370 parts per billion (ppb). In Dordrecht in 2005, another worker was recorded with 11,387 ppb. The national average in the U.S., in 2004, was about 5 ppb.

Water contamination was also a problem in both locations. In Shimizu, PFOA was detected in 10 wells at the site, with the highest level of contamination measuring 1,540 ppb. Groundwater in Dordrecht, which is about an hour south of Amsterdam, was also contaminated, with 1,374 ppb of PFOA at one spot near the factory in 2014.

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Just say Christian


 | America Blog | February 12, 2016

The National Review‘s David French thought it was kind of silly that I and others took issue with Heidi Cruz embracing theocracy on behalf of her husband this week. In his telling, it isn’t at all problematic for Cruz to have said that her husband will govern  with a “combination of the law and religion” because, well, that’s the way it’s supposed to be:

The Christian flag flying over the American flag, via WBTV

The Christian flag flying over the American flag, via WBTV

In reality, Heidi Cruz’s comment represents a standard (and accurate) expression not just of Evangelical beliefs, but also of American history…As for Cruz’s statement that our nation was built on “Judeo-Christian values,” only sheer ahistorical revisionism would downplay the role of the Christian faith and Judeo-Christian values not just with the Founders, but in the founding generation, and the generations that followed. Though there have been (and are) many notable and patriotic atheists who’ve made immense contributions to American life, atheism did not build the United States of America.

Moreover, it’s critical to remind Americans — especially when the media exalts and celebrates secularism — that, yes, our commitment to individual liberty is derived in large part because our earliest Christian settlers fled religious persecution and — ultimately — envisioned a nation uniquely dedicated to limited government and individual liberty — including religious liberty. The Establishment Clause, in fact, was envisioned as a guarantor of religious freedom — and not as it is used today, as a mighty hammer of state religious discrimination.

I agree with Heidi. A President Cruz would safeguard individual liberty because he’s a Christian, not in spite of his faith.

There’s a lot going on here, starting with the rather puzzling assertion that a President Cruz would protect individual (religious) freedoms after preaching a particularly intrusive and privileged brand of Christianity on the campaign trail. But perhaps even stranger is the way that French and Heidi Cruz both seamlessly transitioned between insisting that America was founded on “Judeo-Christian values” and reminding us that America has a particularly Christian (as in, not Jewish) character.

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