About dailyqueernews

Disabled veteran who runs a LGBTI Newsletter.

Chicago Police Institute Reforms Following Damning Report on Treatment of Minorities


Eddie Johnson speaks to the media Monday after Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced that he was appointing him interim superintendent of the Chicago Police Department. (photo: Ashlee Rezin/Sun-Times)
Eddie Johnson speaks to the media Monday after Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced that he was appointing him interim superintendent of the Chicago Police Department. (photo: Ashlee Rezin/Sun-Times)

 

Josh Sanburn | TIME | Reader Supported News | April 22, 2016

Mayor agrees to a third of task-force recommendations

 

hicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel will implement some reforms to the city’s police department in response to a damning report that found officer mistreatment of minorities, but he does not plan to make immediate wholesale changes to how the department operates.

Emanuel announced Thursday that he would implement almost a third of the recommendations from a task force that investigated the police department’s conduct toward African-American residents, including more meetings with black communities, increased training to address implicit bias, and expanded use of Tasers and body cameras.

“As a city, we cannot rest until we fully address the systemic issues facing the Chicago police department, and the steps announced today build on our road to reform,” Emanuel said in a statement on Thursday.

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Alabama’s top judge blames ‘atheists, homosexuals and transgender’ people for legal complaint


Niraj Chokshi | Washington Post | April 29, 2016

Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore, famous for his embrace of religion in the courtroom, says he’s under attack, again.

Moore this week accused the civil rights organization the Southern Poverty Law Center and “atheists, homosexuals and transgender individuals,” of filing politically motivated charges that he violated judicial ethics, AL.com reports.

“For months, I’ve sat back while complaint after complaint has been filed by persons and individuals and organizations which have mischaracterized and misstated my position,” Moore said at a Wednesday news conference recorded and uploaded by AL.com.

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SoCal cops getting ready to use surveillance drones


 

RT America | April 28, 2016

Four police departments in Riverside and San Bernardino counties in California are gearing up to deploy drones in daily operations. Lawmakers worry that the public’s privacy could be at stake under current law, as police are required to obtain a warrant before conducting drone surveillance. RT America’s Brigida Santos reports from California. Then, legal and media analyst Lionel of LionelMedia joins RT America’s Anya Parampil to give his take.

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Florida company running nuclear power plant called to explain water contamination


 

RT America | April 28, 2016

Elevated levels of ammonia, phosphorous and radioactive compounds have been detected in cooling canals connected to the Turkey Point Nuclear Plant south of Miami, Florida, and a have seeped into the Biscayne Aquifer affecting much of south Florida’s drinking water. The company operating the plant is now under a 21-day deadline to provide any information on how it occurred, and negotiate solutions. RT America’s Marina Portnaya reports.

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Why Trump and Clinton share exact same address


 

RT America | April 28, 2016

Both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are among the more than 285,000 corporations who call an address in Delaware home. Specifically, they both use the Corporate Trust Centre at 1209 North Orange Street in Wilmington, Delaware, to take advantage of what is known as the Delaware loophole, which allows corporations to avoid paying taxes on non-physical incomes generated outside the state. The Resident discusses. Follow The Resident at http://www.twitter.com/TheResident

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The Unrepentant Torturers


CIA director John Brennan. (photo: Getty)
CIA director John Brennan. (photo: Getty)

 

John Kiriakou | Reader Supported News | April 28, 2016

he cadre of former CIA directors needs to get its act together on the torture issue. Current director John Brennan said recently that no future CIA director would carry out presidential orders to reconstitute a torture program. Brennan hasn’t had any human rights epiphany. He was, after all, the deputy executive director of the CIA under George W. Bush, during which time he did absolutely nothing to stop torture. He said simply that no CIA officer would carry out such an order because the CIA “needs to endure,” and public opinion may not favor such an action.

As pathetic and roundabout a way as Brennan got to the correct conclusion, there are still a few diehard former directors who insist that a torture program is in the national interest, that it’s not a violation of U.S. and international law, and that it actually keeps Americans safe.

Even after the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence concluded, using primary source CIA documents, that torture did not work, that it did not produce any actionable intelligence, and that it did not save American lives (or anyone else’s, frankly), some former CIA directors still cling to the fallacy that torture was a necessary program.

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How the Transgender Community Is Fighting Bathroom Laws


Kendall Balentine gets a call from her distressed friend and transgender mentee Kendra Heathscott. (photo: Kristina Barker/Washington Post)
Kendall Balentine gets a call from her distressed friend and transgender mentee Kendra Heathscott. (photo: Kristina Barker/Washington Post)

 

Sandhya Somashekhar | The Washington Post | Reader Supported News | April 28, 2016

fter decades of fighting her family, her community and herself over her gender identity, Kendall Balentine finally made peace with it. She became content to live out her retirement quietly, for the first time in her life as a woman, with her wife and dogs in the relative isolation of Deadwood, S.D.

That is, until last month. The South Dakota legislature advanced a bill requiring transgender students to use the bathroom matching the sex on their birth certificates. When an organizer with a national gay rights group called to see if she would come forward to call for the governor to veto the bill, requiring her to push herself into the limelight in a way she never imagined, she didn’t hesitate.

“All my life, I put myself in harm’s way because I couldn’t be who I was,” said Balentine, 49, a retired Marine and deputy sheriff who fully transitioned from living as a man to a woman last year. “I decided now I was willing to die for who I am and fight for those who didn’t have a voice.”

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FBI Would Gain New Hacking Power if Search Warrant Rules Change


Dustin Volz | Reuters | Reader Supported News | April 28, 2016

.S. judges will be able to issue search warrants giving law enforcement agents power to access computers in any jurisdiction, potentially even overseas, under a controversial rule change likely to be approved by the Supreme Court by May 1.

Magistrate judges can normally only order searches within the jurisdiction of their court, which is typically limited to a few counties.

The U.S. Justice Department, which is pushing for the rule change, has described it as a procedural change needed to modernize the criminal code for the digital age, and has said it would not permit searches or seizures that are not already legal.

Google, owned by Alphabet Inc, and civil liberties groups such as the American Civil Liberties Union and Access Now, contend the change would vastly expand the ability of the Federal Bureau of Investigation to hack into computer networks. They say it could run afoul of the U.S. Constitution’s protections against unreasonable searches and seizures.

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NSA data collection about ‘population control’ not law enforcement – whistleblower


 

RT America | April 27, 2016

FBI whistleblower wajoins RT America’s Simone Del Rosario to discuss thye growing concern that the NSA is collecting so much data that it can no longer be effective in preventing terror. Radack says the terror attacks of 9/11 created a ‘blank check’ wherein the usual constraints on surveillance were removed, including probable cause and the necessity of getting a warrant before conducting domestic data collection.

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What Began at Occupy Wall Street Is Reverberating in Today’s Democratic Primary


Charles Pierce | Esquire | Reader Supported News | April 27, 2016

But it’s happening on a different part of the ballot that doesn’t get enough coverage.

t looks to be a big night for the two presidential frontrunners, which leaves next week’s ‘do in Indiana as the last possible chance for anything to shift at that level. But tonight’s action is enlivened because there are a number of critical down-ballot races, especially as regards the Democratic chances of regaining the Senate this fall. In Maryland, Chris Van Hollen and Donna Edwards, both incumbent congresspeople, are locked up in a serious hooley that could go either way, Edwards being the choice of what can loosely be called the Sanders/Warren wing of the party, and a darling of the Netroots. Also in Maryland, there’s an expensive three-way congressional race between a wealthy dilettante, a very promising young Democratic neophyte, and the wife of Chris Matthews. There also is a vigorous primary campaign for mayor of Baltimore.

In Pennsylvania, there’s quite the brawl to run against incumbent Senator Pat Toomey, who is seen as one of the more vulnerable Republican incumbents. Katie McGinty has the White House and most of the Democratic establishment and donor class behind her. She was supposed to walk in. But, at the moment, she’s running behind now-perennial candidate Joe Sestak, a former admiral who has consistently told the Democratic Party hierarchy to go whistle over the past three election cycles. Here, also, is the rare race in which the populist S/W wing is genuinely divided. Sestak is running as an outsider, based almost entirely on the number of famous Democrats he’s alienated, but there’s also the clamorous presence of John Fetterman, the eccentric mayor of Braddock, who is much closer to Sanders on the issues, and is quite the piece of work besides.

“We’ve lost 90 percent of our population and 90 percent of our buildings,” he said. “Ninety percent of our town is in a landfill. So we took a two-pronged approach. We created the first art gallery in the four-town region, with artists’ studios. We did public art installations. And, I don’t know if you consider it arts, exactly, but I consider growing organic vegetables in the shadow of a steel mill an art…”

Can’t argue with that.

Anyway, these elections represent the first serious stirrings at the ballot box of the efforts to reform the Democratic Party that began outside the party structure, in Zuccotti Park and in the streets of Ferguson and Baltimore, and that provided the energy to campaigns like the one that put Warren in the Senate and the one that Sanders has kept rolling throughout the spring. This is not simply the Democratic Party demonstrating its admirably diverse inability to get out of its own way. There is power behind what’s happening here; neither as formidable as it may become, nor particularly well-focused, this power is nonetheless real and its issues and concerns must be addressed. The party must have room for Donna Edwards, Joe Sestak, and John Fetterman, and for their constituents and supporters. Otherwise, a very big opportunity already is lost.

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